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home > recipes > sauces and condiments > amber citrus marmalade
Here's one from circa 1973 (I collect & save recipes for years); so out of my Alton, IL, USA archives, here's a midwestern favorite: AMBER CITRUS MARMALADE 1 Lg. Grapefruit 1 Lemon 1 Lg. Orange Sugar (approx. 7 cups) Wash fruit. Cut grapefruit into 8 wedges, and orange & lemon into 4 wedges. Then cut wedges crosswise into thin slices; save the juice. In a 6-qt. kettle, combine all fruit, fruit juice, and 1 1/2 qts of water. Bring to boiling; boil rapidly, uncovered for 30 minutes or until peel is tender. Measure fruit mixture; return to kettle. Add 1 cup sugar for each cup of fruit mixture. Bring to boiling again, stirring until sugar is dissolved; boil rapidly, stirring frequently for another 30 minutes or until the mixture is thick and reaches jellying point* (Be careful not to overcook since the marmalade would become too dark and tasste scorched.) In the meantime, sterilize 8 (8 oz.) jelly glasses by boiling them for 20 minutes. Keep them in hot water until ready to fill. Lift out with tongs. Remove marmalade from heat. Ladle immediately into hot, sterilized glasses, filling to within 1/2 inch of the top. Cover immediately w/ about 1/8 inch of hot paraffin. Let glasses stand overnight or until cool. Cover glasses with metal lids. Makes 7 or 8 (8 oz.) glasses * To test for jellying point: Dip a large metal spoon into boiling syrup; tilt spoon so syrup runs off edge. Syrup is at jellied point when it doesn't flow, but divides into 2 drops that run together and sheet from the spoon. ***** A "Skeeter's" Neater Way to Do It Tip........... When stuffing snacks, use a pastry tube for soft fillings in things like devilled eggs, stuffing celery, or topping crackers. There's little mess this way and if you use a decorator tip, you'll be a hit with your professional looking touch!

Amber Citrus Marmalade


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keyword: amber
keyword: citrus
keyword: marmalade
recipes for sauces
recipes by dlyonsden
Email Address:
(posted September 27, 1995)

Here's one from circa 1973 (I collect & save recipes for years); so out of my Alton, IL, USA archives, here's a midwestern favorite:

AMBER CITRUS
MARMALADE
1 Lg.
Grapefruit
1
Lemon
1 Lg.
Orange
Sugar (approx. 7 cups)

Wash fruit. Cut
grapefruit into 8 wedges, and orange & lemon into 4 wedges. Then cut wedges crosswise into thin slices; save the juice.

In a 6-qt. kettle,
combine all fruit, fruit juice, and 1 1/2 qts of water. Bring to boiling; boil rapidly, uncovered for 30 minutes or until peel is tender. Measure fruit mixture; return to kettle. Add 1 cup sugar for each cup of
fruit mixture. Bring to boiling again, stirring until
sugar is dissolved; boil rapidly, stirring frequently for another 30 minutes or until the mixture is thick and reaches jellying point* (Be careful not to overcook since the marmalade would become too dark and tasste scorched.)

In the meantime, sterilize 8 (8 oz.)
jelly glasses by boiling them for 20 minutes. Keep them in hot water until ready to fill. Lift out with tongs. Remove marmalade from heat. Ladle immediately into hot, sterilized glasses, filling to within 1/2 inch of the top. Cover immediately w/ about 1/8 inch of hot paraffin. Let glasses stand overnight or until cool. Cover glasses with metal lids.

Makes 7 or 8 (8 oz.) glasses

* To test for jellying point: Dip a large metal spoon into boiling syrup; tilt spoon so syrup runs
off edge. Syrup is at jellied point when it doesn't flow, but divides into 2 drops that run together and sheet from the spoon.

***** A "Skeeter's" Neater Way to Do It Tip...........
When
stuffing snacks, use a pastry tube for soft fillings in things like devilled
eggs, stuffing celery, or topping crackers. There's little mess this way and if you use a decorator tip, you'll be a hit with your professional looking touch!


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