International Recipes Dot Net: Real Recipes from Real People


  You are not logged in
Follow on Twitter!
Search Recipes:
 
site map
advertising info
privacy policy

Share Your Recipe
Most Popular Recipes
Highest Rated Recipes
SyndicateThis


Random Recipe
Chocolate Ripple Cake






Food Dictionary
Theme Sections
Photo Gallery
F.A.Q.


home > recipes > vegetables > arepas
I prepared the following for a school teacher who wanted to teach a class how to make some Venezuelan foods for a social studies class, then later adapted it to send to Carole Walberg as a thank you for recipes she sent to me. As I was sending it, I thought it might be something of interest for your International Foods List. Use it as you see fit, or whatever. Sincerely, Ward Williams Caracas, Venezuela VENEZUELAN FOODS The ingredients necessary to make traditional Venezuelan foods may be very difficult to find in the United States. Much of it contains roots, such as yuca, or a type of sweet potato (called batata) and a whole variety of other things that I have never seen in the U.S. The ever-popular *arepa* is made with ground, cooked white corn meal, which may be impossible to find. As you can see, this could be a challenge. (When we lived in Connecticut, we had to go to the Cuban section of Hartford in order to find plantain bananas and black beans.) Here are some of the most popular *criolla* dishes that are readily available in local restaurants and made by Venezuelans at home. AREPA (corn cakes) The *arepa* (ah-ray-pah; with the accent on the middle syllable) is the local equivalent of a hamburger and is sold in shops called an *arepera* (ah-ray-pay-rah; with the accent on the third syllable). The arepas are cooked fresh. The buyer looks in a cafeteria type hot table to choose the filling s/he desires. Fillings include shredded cheese, stringy meat cooked in spices, chicken salad with avacado, egg scrambled with onion and green peppers, diced sausage, and a variety of other things. Perhaps the most popular filling is grated American cheese (the one that has a cheddar flavor and is somewhat soft). The arepa is split open like a hamburger bun (by the person behind the counter), some of the steaming moist corn meal is scooped out and discarded, and the filling is added. The arepa is wrapped in a square of slick paper, like butcher paper, and handed to the purchaser to eat standing up. Arepas are also made smaller and served in the bread basket at restaurants. An arepa may be cooked three different ways. Boiled in water, baked in the oven, or fried in hot oil. In the country they are often cooked on a charcoal grill. Most often they are browned on the outside by cooking briefly on a hot griddle, and then placed in the oven (400 degrees) for 15 minutes. (Remember: the corn meal that is used is pre-cooked, so the *cooking* process is only to give the arepa some color and to make it hot.) The arepa is *done* when it sounds hollow when tapped. HOW TO MAKE AN AREPA Take a cup of finely ground, pre-cooked, corn meal (white is preferable, but yellow is also used), add an equal amount of water, a dash of salt and a teaspoon of cooking oil. Kneed the mixture with your hands until it is thoroughly blended into a dough. Take a small amount of the dough and pat it into a flat, round cake, about the size of the palm of your hand, or slightly smaller. It should be about a quarter of an inch thick. Shape and press it around the edges to make it even and smooth. Continue making more cakes until the dough is used up. Grease a heavy skillet or griddle and place it over a low flame. It should not be too hot. When the surface is hot place the cakes, one or two at a time, on the griddle to brown on both sides. Put them in the oven to bake for about 15 minutes. (You may also fry them, turning once, in about a quarter inch of hot oil.) TO SERVE: Slice the arepa like a hamburger bun, discard some of the steaming meal that is still soft in the middle, fill with choice of filling, close the arepa and serve immediately. Alternate method: make small arepas about the size of a silver dollar and fry in oil until golden brown on both sides. Serve as bread with a meal. Have butter and cheese available.

Arepas


average rating = 4.5 stars(4.675737 comments available)
SUBMITTED BY
list all recipes for VEGETABLES (485)
list all South American recipes (79)
list all recipes by WARD_WILLIAMS (6)


   

conversions contact author view cookbook print recipe
email recipe add to cookbook add to calendar add to shopping list

Recipe Alert Most Popular Recipes Photo
(posted September 11, 1995)

I prepared the following for a school teacher who wanted to teach a class how to make some Venezuelan foods for a social studies class, then later adapted it to send to Carole Walberg as a thank you for recipes she sent to me. As I was sending it, I thought it might be something of interest for your International Foods List. Use it as you see fit, or whatever.

Sincerely,

Ward Williams
Caracas, Venezuela

VENEZUELAN FOODS

The ingredients necessary to make traditional Venezuelan foods may be very difficult to find in the United States. Much of it contains roots, such as yuca, or a type of sweet potato (called batata) and a whole variety of other things that I have never seen in the U.S. The ever-popular *arepa* is made with ground, cooked white corn meal, which may be impossible to find. As you can see, this could be a challenge. (When we lived in Connecticut, we had to go to the Cuban section of Hartford in order to find plantain bananas and black beans.)

Here are some of the most popular *criolla* dishes that are readily available in local restaurants and made by Venezuelans at home.


AREPA (corn cakes)

The *arepa* (ah-ray-pah; with the accent on the middle syllable) is the local equivalent of a hamburger and is sold in shops called an *arepera* (ah-ray-pay-rah; with the accent on the third syllable). The arepas are cooked fresh. The buyer looks in a cafeteria type hot table to choose the filling s/he desires.

Fillings include shredded cheese, stringy meat cooked in spices, chicken salad with avacado, egg scrambled with onion and green peppers, diced sausage, and a variety of other things. Perhaps the most popular filling is grated American cheese (the one that has a cheddar flavor and is somewhat soft).

The arepa is split open like a hamburger bun (by the person behind the counter), some of the steaming moist corn meal is scooped out and discarded, and the filling is added. The arepa is wrapped in a square of slick paper, like butcher paper, and handed to the purchaser to eat standing up.

Arepas are also made smaller and served in the bread basket at restaurants.

An arepa may be cooked three different ways. Boiled in water, baked in the oven, or fried in hot oil. In the country they are often cooked on a charcoal grill. Most often they are browned on the outside by cooking briefly on a hot griddle, and then placed in the oven (400 degrees) for 15 minutes.
(Remember: the corn meal that is used is pre-cooked, so the *cooking* process is only to give the arepa some color and to make it hot.) The arepa is *done* when it sounds hollow when tapped.

HOW TO MAKE AN AREPA

Take a cup of finely ground, pre-cooked, corn meal (white is preferable, but yellow is also used), add an equal amount of water, a dash of salt and a teaspoon of cooking oil.

Kneed the mixture with your hands until it is thoroughly blended into a dough.

Take a small amount of the dough and pat it into a flat, round cake, about the size of the palm of your hand, or slightly smaller. It should be about a quarter of an inch thick. Shape and press it around the edges to make it even and smooth.
Continue making more cakes until the dough is used up.

Grease a heavy skillet or griddle and place it over a low flame. It should not be too hot. When the surface is hot place the cakes, one or two at a time, on the griddle to brown on both sides. Put them in the oven to bake for about 15 minutes.
(You may also fry them, turning once, in about a quarter inch of hot oil.)

TO SERVE: Slice the arepa like a hamburger bun, discard some of the steaming meal that is still soft in the middle, fill with choice of filling, close the arepa and serve immediately.

Alternate method: make small arepas about the size of a silver dollar and fry in oil until golden brown on both sides.
Serve as bread with a meal. Have butter and cheese available.


Please click here to read our policy on submitted comments
+37 comments


from Columbus, Ohio, United States wrote:9  0

Take 1cup white cornmeal slightly cover with water in pot. bring to boil then simmer for 15 min. add about 1/2 cup water 2tsp salt and 1tsp whit pepper. simmer for 15 more min. Let cool. now you don't have to buy precooked cornmeal
5 starsFebruary 19, 2009


from Orlando, Fl. , United States wrote:7  1

I live in Orlando, & am Venezuelan, in my house hold we love arepas to death and find myself making them at least twice a week for my girls and myself. Thanks for some new ideas.
5 starsApril 9, 2008


from cairo, Egypt wrote:1  2

i lived in venzuela and i loved arepas so much..the recipe is great thx a lot
4 starsMarch 9, 2008


from San Francisco, United States wrote:6  0

A Venezuelan friend told me to drop the uncooked patties into boiling water; when they float to the top, take them out and cook as described in this recipe. They are delicious this way - has anyone else heard of this method?
5 starsFebruary 8, 2008


from Las Vegas, NV, United States wrote:14  0

I learned to make arepas from my Colombian husband's mother. Similar recipe, just replaced chicken broth for the water and added grated parmesan cheese. To make perfect circles, roll out dough and cut out with large cup or glass. Love them!
4 starsNovember 8, 2007


from Fort Lauderdale, FL, United States wrote:12  0

Hola!! Im venezuelan living in USA for over 10 years. I know how to make arepas; just like you mentioned here. Also have the "tosti-arepa". You can find the "arina-Pan" at the latin food section on almost any supermarket. Thanks for the recipe, again!!
5 starsJune 30, 2007


from Douglas, MA, United States wrote:3  0

Oster makes an Arepa cooker. Not sure if its authentic style but it may be of interest to someone who makes a lot of them
5 starsApril 28, 2007


from Gainesville, FL, United States wrote:7  5

My wife is Colombian, and I just love arepas! I have learned to make them and some other traditional dishes from her country. She loves that I am doing so much. Though it's not the same as being in Colombia, it does take us back!
5 starsApril 23, 2007


from miami, florida, United States wrote:5  0

A gringo twist in Miami is to make the arepas and put them in a smoker with apple or hickory chips...much better than biscuits at a barb-b-q!
3 starsJanuary 21, 2007


from Las Vegas NV, United States wrote:8  8

My husband is from Venezeula, and I LOVE ARAPES. these are wonderful filled with hamburger meat and cheese. They are my favorite food now!
5 starsDecember 15, 2006


from Columbia, MD, United States wrote:6  5

My fiancee lives in Venezuela and I just returned from my second visit there. I love Arepas as well as the other foods there. Great site...thanks!
4 starsJune 19, 2006


from Houston,Tx, United States wrote:3  4

well i played basketball there and i loved them as well...i need to go back just for that...those arepas
5 starsApril 15, 2006


from Atlanta, GA, United States wrote:7  2

Great recipe, and very true to what arepas are supposed to be.
In Atlanta, there is a lady that makes delicious arepas with shredded beef, "carne mechada", cachapas (corn cakes) with a hand crafted cheese "queso de mano "-( a Venezuelan flatlands cousin of mozzarella), and tequenos... and all are "finger licking good".
Her name is Nancy and her phone number is 770-876-3510
5 starsApril 12, 2006


from Overland Park, KS, United States wrote:15  5

I lived in Maracaibo (Creole Oil Camp, 1955-1960) as a child, and loved going to my friend's houses for arepas. Here in the Kansas City area, Price Chopper Stores carry the PAN brand masa for this recipe. Wish I could find Maracai cheese for Tequenos!! YUMMY!
5 starsApril 6, 2006


from pearland , texas, United States wrote:12  4

Great recipe. My mother grew up in Guirra and this is how she made it.
5 starsDecember 20, 2005


from Blytheville, AR 72316, United States wrote:6  6

I grew up in Venezuela, lived in San Roque in estado Anzoategui for 2 years and in Caracas for 10. I love arepas and miss my "country". Venezuelan food is to die for! Gracias!
4 starsNovember 9, 2005


from Phoenix, AZ, United States wrote:12  5

Try buying the white corn meal through an online store at www.amigofoods.com. We buy Peruvian, Costa Rican, and Argentinian specialties. The prices are decent, the shipping is prompt, but getting a little pricey. My wife bought some of the meal because she fell in love with arepas in VE.
4 starsSeptember 28, 2005


from Dayton, Ohio, United States wrote:14  4

This is an accurate recipe and basically the same as I use. I was introduce to arepa last year by a young man from
Venezuela who stayed at my home while playing minor league baseball. He taught me to make it. The brand of pre-cooked corn meal we use is called P.A.N. and comes from Venezuela. Most Latin stores carry it as well as Jungle Jim's International Market in Cinn., OH. Someone commented on a machine called Tostiarepa. If you don't know anyone who can bring you one of these, Oster has an arepamaker which makes 6 arepas at once. It can be purchased on line from Oster.com or Amazon.com
5 starsSeptember 25, 2005


from Durban, South Africa wrote:13  6

I was born in Venezuela, and have missed the delicious arepa ever since I left the country many years ago. Now in South Africa with lots of cornmeal (although not pre-cooked) I have tried oyur recipe with great success...filled not only with flavour, but lots of nostalgia!
5 starsSeptember 4, 2005


from Alexandria, VA, United States wrote:10  6

I am a Venezuelan and I know how to make arepas and I find this recipe very accurate. I agree with Brandy about not discarding the soft part of the arepa. If you don't like it in your arepa then scoop it out and put some butter on it and it will taste great, I recommend it.
5 starsAugust 27, 2005


from Salt Lake City, United States wrote:6  6

Great recepie for arepas! i am from Puerto Ordaz, Guayana!! de verdad me gusto mucho la receta!! bien por esa panita
5 starsMarch 1, 2005


from Boulder, CO, United States wrote:20  7

I lived in Venezuela when I was little & naturally, we ate arepas all the time.

You mention discarding the steaming meal in the inside ?!?!? That is the BEST PART of the arepa - it is warm and soft! Add butter and salt, and that is my idea of heaven. Perhaps, if it doesn't taste done, you didn't cook it long enough.

Give the soft meal in the inside a chance - scooping it out is a "sin".
3 starsJune 24, 2004


from Madrid, Spain wrote:7  8

Soy caraqueña y tengo 3 años viviendo en Madrid, no me imagino vivir sin degustar las arepas y lo continuamos haciendo muy a menudo gracias a que aqui venden la harina de maíz.
5 starsFebruary 12, 2004


from Oranjestad, Aruba wrote:7  5

Your recipe is great and bring back memories of my student years in Caracas Venezuela, Thanks you!
5 starsFebruary 9, 2004


from Chicago, United States wrote:6  4

When I lived In Trinidad I would visit Venezuela in the summer with my parents. We had Arepas every morning. Thanks for the recipe!
5 starsDecember 6, 2003


from Wuerzburg, Germany wrote:10  6

I was born in Venezuela and my Aunt used to make Arepas for us, they are such a great childhood memory! Thanks for helping other people learn how to make them!
5 starsSeptember 15, 2003


from Houston, Texas, United States wrote:7  5

Arepas are awesome they are like the PB&J of the U.S. I lived in Caracas and Puerto La Cruz for five years and miss the Areperias all over.
5 starsSeptember 10, 2003


from Los Realejos, Spain wrote:7  5

Very good recipe! Just tried it. Works great. I live in Tenerife and we have plenty of 'Areperas' here, but I always wanted to make them myself. This is probably the best recipe in the Net. I wonder if somebody could mail me a recipe for the filling which
5 starsJuly 23, 2003


from Atlanta, United States wrote:16  4

Good recipe. I need to tell everybody that there is a machine named TostiArepa used to toast the arepas in just 7 minutes. If you know someone coming from Venezuela ask for that machine is cheap and is the best way to cook the arepas. Another thing is
5 starsJune 24, 2003


from California, United States wrote:6  6

I love Arepas. Grew up eating them...ever since i moved to the states, i havent made them because I didnt know which flour i needed. Thanks for the recipe.
4 starsApril 3, 2003


from rochester, ny, United States wrote:6  6

Oh what i wouldnt give to get some of the authentic, coarse, white coarn meal that was used to make them when i lived in Ven.
I recall that there were people who prepared them daily and delivered them to your house ., much like one would have a newspape
4 starsFebruary 8, 2003


from San Diego, CA, United States wrote:7  7

I lived in La Guira, Venezuela, for a few years as a child, about 50 years ago. I loved arepas and have been looking for a recipe for years. This looks like it!!
5 starsJanuary 13, 2003


from San Jose, CA, United States wrote:8  4

I visited Venezuela 9 years ago and LOVED Arepas - I'm so glad I looked for a recipe on the web as I've asked many people about them -noone I spoke with had ever heard of them! Thanks!
5 starsDecember 18, 2002


from Seattle, Wa., United States wrote:4  9

I spent 12 yrs in Maracaibo. Your recipe sounds great MUST try it soon. But I miss my cook!!!!
5 starsJune 18, 2002


from Diego Martin, Trinidad and Tobago wrote:6  5

Loved your web page! I had forgotten how to cook the arepas....Thank you
Muchas Gracias
5 starsAugust 24, 2001


from Berkeley, CA, United States wrote:7  6

Thank you for sharing such wonderful information about arepas. Everyone should be aware though that arepas may also be prepared using prepackaged mararepa dough or maza-more commonly found. Wonderful information! Thank you for sharing!
5 starsMarch 30, 2001


from JACKSONVILLE FL, United States wrote:7  6

These are great if filled with the white cheese sold in Spanish stores. I went to Ven. a couple of years ago and have been hooked ever since!
4 starsJanuary 29, 2001


 
Rating:
Name:
Email 1:
City, State:
Country:
Comments:
1 Your email address will not be displayed to others, nor will it be used for any marketing purposes or released
to any third party.


©1995-2017 SimpleSolutions Corporation. All Rights Reserved.