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home > recipes > seafood > broiled trout
from New Jersey, USA Broiled Trout On occasion I have been the happy recipient of freshly caught trout. These splendid small fish can be served in a large number of ways, but broiling is a good choice. Allow one fish per person. trout salt olive oil lemon wedges and juice fresh tarragon butter Scale and wash the fish, and make sure the inside is well cleaned. Cut off the head, and either cut around all fins, or remove them. Pat dry. Very lightly salt the inside, and place several sprigs of fresh tarragon inside each fish (optional). Coat very lightly with olive oil, or oil of your choice. This will keep them from drying out and also prevent their sticking to the broiler pan. Broil for 3-4 minutes per side, turning carefully. Make certain the fish is cooked thru, but not dried out. Remove tarragon before serving. This method works well for many varieties, both large and small. Filleting small fish after cooking is much easier, allows one to get rid of all the small bones, and reserves the flesh for eating rather than ending up on the cutting board. To fillet after cooking, carefully lift the skin starting at the head end. Loosen the skin all the way across, then lift and pull it down the length of the fish. It should come off in one piece if properly cooked. Now starting at the top again, lift under the backbone with a fork, and guide with a table knife, down the length of the fish to remove the backbone from the lower fillet, while turning the top fillet away from you to the plate beside the bottom fillet. If done smoothly and quickly, the fillet will not break apart. Good luck here, that is the trickiest part! And the bigger the fish, the more deft one must be. A fish server is helpful but not necessary. Now lift the backbone with its attached small bones up from the inside of this top fillet. If properly cooked, they will all be removed. Now turn the lower fillet carefully and remove the skin. Dress these lovely little fillets with a bit of lemon butter, or plain lemon and enjoy! I like to serve broil trout or any sweet small fish fillets with lightly seasoned rice, or boiled new potatoes, and a mixed fresh vegetable dish, such as green or yellow beans, with carrots and peas or pea pods. A salad with a light creamy dressing is better than too strong a vinaigrette which can take away from the delicate flavor of the fish. Finish with a citrus sherbet, or mixed fresh fruit containing citrus, and you'll have a meal worth remembering for a long time.

Broiled Trout


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keyword: broiled
keyword: trout
recipes for seafood
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Email Address:
(posted November 17, 1996)

from New Jersey, USA

Broiled
Trout

On occasion I have been the happy recipient of freshly caught
trout. These splendid small fish can be served in a large number
of ways, but broiling is a good choice. Allow one
fish per
person.

trout salt
olive oil lemon wedges and juice
fresh
tarragon butter

Scale and wash the fish, and make sure the inside is well
cleaned. Cut
off the head, and either cut around all fins,
or remove them. Pat
dry. Very lightly salt the inside, and
place several sprigs of fresh
tarragon inside each fish
(optional).
Coat very lightly with
olive oil, or oil of
your choice. This will keep them from drying out and also
prevent their sticking to the broiler
pan. Broil for 3-4
minutes per side, turning carefully. Make certain the
fish
is
cooked thru, but not dried out. Remove tarragon before
serving. This method works well for many varieties, both
large and small. Filleting small
fish after cooking is
much easier, allows one to get rid of all the small bones,
and reserves the flesh for eating rather than ending up
on the
cutting board.

To
fillet after cooking, carefully lift the skin starting
at the head end. Loosen the
skin all the way across, then
lift and pull it down the
length of the fish. It should
come
off in one piece if properly cooked. Now starting at
the top again, lift under the backbone with a fork, and
guide with a table
knife, down the length of the fish to
remove the backbone from the lower
fillet, while turning
the top
fillet away from you to the plate beside the
bottom
fillet. If done smoothly and quickly, the fillet
will not break apart. Good luck here, that is the trickiest
part!

And the bigger the
fish, the more deft one
must be. A fish
server is helpful but not necessary. Now lift the backbone
with its attached small bones up from the inside of this
top
fillet. If properly cooked, they will all be removed.
Now turn the lower
fillet carefully and remove the skin.
Dress these lovely little fillets with a bit of lemon butter,
or plain
lemon and enjoy!

I like to serve
broil trout or any sweet small fish fillets
with lightly seasoned
rice, or boiled new potatoes, and a
mixed fresh vegetable dish, such as
green or yellow beans,
with carrots and peas or
pea pods. A salad with a light
creamy dressing is better than too strong a vinaigrette which
can take away from the delicate flavor of the
fish. Finish
with a citrus
sherbet, or mixed fresh fruit containing citrus,
and you'll have a
meal worth remembering for a long time.





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