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home > recipes > breads > day of the dead bread 2
from PA, US Pan de Muertos, a.k.a. All Souls Bread Introduction from Wikipedia (www.wikipedia.com) The Day of the Dead (Día de los Muertos, Día de los Difuntos or Día de Muertos in Spanish) is a holiday celebrated in many parts of the world, typically on November 1 (All Saints' Day) and November 2 (All Souls' Day). In Mexico, where the holiday has perhaps its highest prominence, the holiday has ancient Aztec and mesoamerican roots, and is a national holiday. The Day of the Dead is also celebrated to a lesser extent in other Latin American countries; for example, it is a public holiday in Brazil, where many Brazilians celebrate it by visiting cemeteries and churches. The holiday is also observed in the Philippines. Observance of the holiday has spread to Mexican-American communities in the United States, where in some locations, the traditions are being extended. Similarly-themed celebrations also appear in some Asian and African cultures. Though the subject matter may be considered morbid from the perspective of some other cultures, celebrants typically approach the Day of the Dead joyfully, and though it occurs at the same time as Halloween, All Saints' Day and All Souls Day, the traditional mood is much brighter with emphasis on celebrating and honoring the lives of the deceased, and celebrating the continuation of life; the belief is not that death is the end, but rather the beginning of a new stage in life. 1 1/2 cups of flour 1/2 cup of sugar 1 teaspoon of salt 1 tablespoon of anise seed 2 packets of dry yeast 1/2 cup of milk 1/2 cup of water 1/2 cup of butter 4 eggs 3 to 4 1/2 cups of flour Mix all dry ingredients together except the 3 - 4 1/2 cups of flour. In a small pan, heat the milk, the water, and the butter. Add the liquid mixture to the dry mixture. Beat well. Mix in the eggs and 1 1/2 cups of flour. Beat well. Put in the rest of the flour, little by little. Knead the mixture on a floured board for 9 - 10 minutes. Put the dough in a greased bowl and allow it to rise until it has doubled in size (about an hour and a half at sea level). Punch the dough down and reshape it with some "bone" shapes on top to decorate it. Let it rise another hour. Bake at 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) for about 40 minutes. After baking, sprinkle it with confectioner's sugar and colored sugar.

Day of the Dead Bread 2


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keyword: bread
ethnicity: mexican
recipes for breads
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(posted January 2, 2007)

from PA, US

Pan de Muertos, a.k.a. All Souls Bread

Introduction from Wikipedia (www.wikipedia.com)

The Day of the Dead (Día de los Muertos, Día de los Difuntos or Día de Muertos in Spanish) is a holiday celebrated in many parts of the world, typically on November 1 (All Saints' Day) and November 2 (All Souls' Day).

In
Mexico, where the holiday has perhaps its highest prominence, the holiday has ancient Aztec and mesoamerican roots, and is a national holiday. The Day of the Dead is also celebrated to a lesser extent in other Latin American countries; for example, it is a public holiday in Brazil, where many Brazilians celebrate it by visiting cemeteries and churches. The holiday is also observed in the Philippines. Observance of the holiday has spread to Mexican-American communities in the United States, where in some locations, the traditions are being extended. Similarly-themed celebrations also appear in some Asian and African cultures.

Though the subject matter may be considered morbid from the perspective of some other cultures, celebrants typically approach the Day of the Dead joyfully, and though it occurs at the same time as Halloween, All Saints' Day and All Souls Day, the traditional mood is much brighter with emphasis on celebrating and honoring the lives of the deceased, and celebrating the continuation of life; the belief is not that death is the end, but rather the beginning of a new stage in life.

1 1/2 cups of
flour
1/2 cup of
sugar
1 teaspoon of
salt
1 tablespoon of
anise seed
2 packets of
dry yeast
1/2 cup of
milk
1/2 cup of water
1/2 cup of
butter
4
eggs
3 to 4 1/2 cups of
flour

Mix all
dry ingredients together except the 3 - 4 1/2 cups of flour. In a small pan, heat the milk, the water, and the butter. Add the liquid mixture to the dry mixture. Beat well. Mix in the eggs and 1 1/2 cups of flour. Beat well. Put in the rest of the flour, little by little. Knead the mixture on a floured board for 9 - 10 minutes.

Put the
dough in a greased bowl and allow it to rise until it has doubled in size (about an hour and a half at sea level). Punch the dough down and reshape it with some "bone" shapes on top to decorate it. Let it rise another hour. Bake at 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) for about 40 minutes.

After
baking, sprinkle it with confectioner's sugar and colored sugar.



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