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home > recipes > meat > guisado de res
Guisado de Res (Carne Guisado) from Corpus Christi, Texas USA 2-1/2 pounds boneless beef chuck roast, fat and gristle removed 1/2 cup all purpose flour Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste Bacon grease, lard, or shortening Beef stock or water or a combination 1 large onion, chopped 2-3 cloves garlic, minced 1 cup celery, chopped 2 cups carrots, chopped 2-3 serrano chilies, seeded and chopped fine 2 cups potatoes (about two large russets), peeled and cubed 15-ounce can of peeled, chopped tomatoes 1/2 cup chopped cilantro leaves 1-2 teaspoons ground cumin Extra fresh cilantro for garnish (optional) Cut chuck roast into small bite sized pieces. Place flour in plastic bag with salt and freshly ground pepper. Shake until meat is coated completely by flour mixture. Heat grease or lard or oil in Dutch oven and brown the meat, taking care to shake excess flour off the pieces before putting them into the pot. Pour stock and/or water into pot until meat is covered, making sure a half-inch or so liquid is over the beef so that it does not stick to the bottom of the pot. Simmer for about 2 hours, stirring now and then to prevent sticking. Then add onion, garlic, celery, carrots, chopped chilies, cubed potatoes, tomatoes, cilantro, and cumin, with a bit more stock or water to keep ingredients from sticking to bottom. (Dish should be of a stew-like consistency, not like a soup.) Simmer another 1/2 to 1 hour or until meat is very tender and all vegetables are well cooked. Serve with flour tortillas warmed on a griddle. (Microwaving flour tortillas makes them rubbery!) This is a "hybrid" version of carne guidsado. That is, almost all Mexican kitchens have a recipe for the dish, especially in the Northern states (Tamaulipas, Nuevo Leon, &c.), but when you cross the border, the dish becomes more akin to an American-style stew with the addition of the vegetables, which usually are not added to Mexican versions. I like to add a bit of fresh cilantro to the finished dish, and if the serranos do not make it hot enough for you, you can sprinkle in some hot pepper flakes, Louisiana hot sauce (made with so-called Tabasco peppers), chopped canned jalapenos, or any other fiery ingredient you wish. Makes a great Sunday dinner or filling dish for a crowd.

Guisado de Res


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keyword: guisado
recipes for meat
recipes by j.martin1218
Email Address:
(posted July 12, 2006)

Guisado de Res (
Carne Guisado)

from Corpus Christi,
Texas USA

2-1/2 pounds boneless
beef chuck roast, fat and gristle removed
1/2 cup all purpose
flour
Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
Bacon grease, lard, or shortening
Beef stock or water or a combination
1 large
onion, chopped
2-3 cloves
garlic, minced
1 cup
celery, chopped
2 cups carrots, chopped
2-3 serrano chilies, seeded and chopped fine
2 cups potatoes (about two large russets), peeled and cubed
15-ounce can of peeled, chopped tomatoes
1/2 cup chopped
cilantro leaves
1-2 teaspoons ground
cumin
Extra fresh
cilantro for garnish (optional)

Cut
chuck roast into small bite sized pieces. Place flour in plastic bag with salt and freshly ground pepper. Shake until meat is coated completely by flour mixture. Heat grease or lard or oil in Dutch oven and brown the meat, taking care to shake excess flour off the pieces before putting them into the
pot. Pour stock and/or water into pot until meat is covered, making sure a half-inch or so liquid is over the beef so that it does not stick to the bottom of the pot. Simmer for about 2 hours, stirring now and then to prevent sticking. Then add onion, garlic, celery, carrots, chopped chilies, cubed potatoes, tomatoes, cilantro, and cumin, with a bit more stock or water to keep ingredients from sticking to bottom. (Dish should be of a stew-like consistency, not like a soup.) Simmer another 1/2 to 1 hour or until meat is very tender and all vegetables are well cooked. Serve with flour tortillas warmed on a griddle. (Microwaving flour tortillas makes them rubbery!)

This is a "hybrid" version of
carne guidsado. That is, almost all Mexican kitchens have a recipe for the dish, especially in the Northern states (Tamaulipas, Nuevo Leon, &c.), but when you cross the border, the dish becomes more akin to an American-style stew with the addition of the vegetables, which usually are not added to Mexican versions. I like to add a bit of fresh cilantro to the finished dish, and if the serranos do not make it hot enough for you, you can sprinkle in some
hot pepper flakes, Louisiana hot sauce (made with so-called Tabasco peppers), chopped canned jalapenos, or any other fiery ingredient you wish. Makes a great Sunday dinner or filling dish for a crowd.


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