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home > recipes > meat > honeybaked ham glaze
Here's another one from Top Secret Recipes! TSR has discovered that the tender hams are delivered to each of the 300 HoneyBaked outlets already smoked, but without the glaze. It is only when the ham gets to your local HoneyBaked store that a special machine thin-slices the tender meat in a spiral fashion around the bone. One at a time, each ham is then coated with the glaze - a blend that is similar to what might be used to make pumpkin pie. This sweet coating is then caramelized with a blowtorch by hand until the glaze bubbles and melts, turning golden brown. If needed, more of the coating is added, and the blowtorch is fired up until the glaze is just right. It's this careful process that turns the same size ham that costs 20 dollars in a supermarket into one that customers gladly shell out 3 to 4 times as much to share during the holiday season. For this clone recipe, we will re-create the glaze that you can apply to a smoked/cooked bone-in ham of your choice. Look for a ham that is pre-sliced. Otherwise you'll have to slice it yourself with a sharp knife, then the glaze will be applied. To get the coating just right you must use a blowtorch. Get the kind that are used for crème brűlée from almost any kitchen supply store. They're usually pretty cheap. And don't worry - I didn't leave out an ingredient. No honey is necessary to re-create this favorite holiday glaze. Happy Holidays!! 1 fully cooked shank half ham, bone in (pre-sliced) 1 cup sugar 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg 1/4 teaspoon ground clove 1/4 teaspoon paprika dash ground ginger dash ground allspice 1. If you couldn't find a pre-sliced ham, the first thing you must do is slice it. Use a very sharp knife to cut the ham into very thin slices around the bone. Do not cut all the way down to the bone or the meat may not hold together properly as it is being glazed. You want the slices to be quite thin, but not so thin that they fall apart or off the bone. You may wish to turn the ham onto its flat end and cut around it starting at the bottom. You can then spin the ham as you slice around and work your way up. 2. Mix the remaining ingredients together in a small bowl. 3. Lay down a couple sheets of wax paper onto a flat surface such as your kitchen counter. Pour the sugar mixture onto wax paper and spread it around evenly. 4. Pick up the ham and roll it over the sugar mixture so that it is well coated. Do not coat the flat end of the ham, just the outer, pre-sliced surface. 5. Turn the ham onto its flat end on the plate. Use a blowtorch with a medium-size flame to caramelize the sugar. Wave the torch over the sugar with rapid movement, so that the sugar bubbles and browns, but does not burn. Spin the plate so you can torch the entire surface of the ham. Repeat the coating and caramelizing process until the ham has been well glazed (don't expect to use all of the sugar mixture). Serve the ham cold or reheated, just like the real thing.

Honeybaked Ham Glaze


average rating = 5 stars(5.000011 comments available)
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list all recipes by DAVE (405)


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(posted December 21, 2004)

Here's another one from Top Secret Recipes!

TSR has discovered that the tender hams are delivered to each of the 300 HoneyBaked outlets already smoked, but without the glaze. It is only when the ham gets to your local HoneyBaked store that a special machine thin-slices the tender meat in a spiral fashion around the bone. One at a time, each ham is then coated with the glaze - a blend that is similar to what might be used to make pumpkin pie. This sweet coating is then caramelized with a blowtorch by hand until the glaze bubbles and melts, turning golden brown. If needed, more of the coating is added, and the blowtorch is fired up until the glaze is just right. It's this careful process that turns the same size ham that costs 20 dollars in a supermarket into one that customers gladly shell out 3 to 4 times as much to share during the holiday season.

For this clone recipe, we will re-create the glaze that you can apply to a smoked/cooked bone-in ham of your choice. Look for a ham that is pre-sliced. Otherwise you'll have to slice it yourself with a sharp knife, then the glaze will be applied. To get the coating just right you must use a blowtorch. Get the kind that are used for crème brűlée from almost any kitchen supply store. They're usually pretty cheap. And don't worry - I didn't leave out an ingredient. No honey is necessary to re-create this favorite holiday glaze. Happy Holidays!!

1 fully cooked shank half ham, bone in (pre-sliced)
1 cup sugar
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon ground clove
1/4 teaspoon paprika
dash ground ginger
dash ground allspice

1. If you couldn't find a pre-sliced ham, the first thing you must do is slice it. Use a very sharp knife to cut the ham into very thin slices around the bone. Do not cut all the way down to the bone or the meat may not hold together properly as it is being glazed. You want the slices to be quite thin, but not so thin that they fall apart or off the bone. You may wish to turn the ham onto its flat end and cut around it starting at the bottom. You can then spin the ham as you slice around and work your way up.
2. Mix the remaining ingredients together in a small bowl.
3. Lay down a couple sheets of wax paper onto a flat surface such as your kitchen counter. Pour the sugar mixture onto wax paper and spread it around evenly.
4. Pick up the ham and roll it over the sugar mixture so that it is well coated. Do not coat the flat end of the ham, just the outer, pre-sliced surface.
5. Turn the ham onto its flat end on the plate. Use a blowtorch with a medium-size flame to caramelize the sugar. Wave the torch over the sugar with rapid movement, so that the sugar bubbles and browns, but does not burn. Spin the plate so you can torch the entire surface of the ham. Repeat the coating and caramelizing process until the ham has been well glazed (don't expect to use all of the sugar mixture). Serve the ham cold or reheated, just like the real thing.


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+11 comments


from Grand Rapids, Mich, United States wrote:4  0

Marilyn, gammon and ham are both cut from the pig's leg and the only substantial difference between the two is that Ham is cut from the carcass and then brined and optionally smoked whereas gammon is brined and then cut from the carcass and perhaps smoked. This recipe should work well on either.
5 starsNovember 28, 2009


from Cape Town, South Africa wrote:4  0

Does anyone know the difference between Gammon and the Ham for this recipe? I life in South Africa and Gammon is everywhere, but I don't know if it's the same thing. Help!! Just desperate to try this recipe cause I used to live in Los Angeles and Honeybaked Ham was a tradition that I'd like to take to South Africa. Thanks,
5 starsNovember 27, 2009


from California, United States wrote:9  1

Well, we no longer have to shell out mega bucks for a Honeybaked ham! I don't have a torch, so I decided to use the glaze version, the one where you add just enough water to make a runny glaze. Well, I stopped short of that. I added JUST enough water to make a paste. I applied this paste all over the ham, when the ham was about 30 minutes from doneness. That 30 minutes of baking w/sugar paste did the trick. It hardened just like it's supposed to with the torch. Also, I used pumpkin pie spice (1 tsp) rather than measuring each spice individually. I used the same measurements as suggested here for the paprika, and added 1/4 tsp ground cloves, which was a might too much, but it still didn't effect the outcome. Everyone at my table loved this. It was hard to not go back for thirds and fourths. I'm amazed I have any ham left, in fact! LOL

My husband was the only one who didn't like the heavy clove flavor, but then he's not a fan of cloves. However, he still loved this ham, better than Honeybaked, in his opinion - and everyone else was in agreement. Blew us away with its awesomeness. Best thing of all, this ham - a Farmer John shank - only cost me $8.77, comparead to over $80 at the Honeybaked store.

This is THE best recipe I've yet found for glazing a ham. Five stars doesn't do it justice; I would give it 10! And I am a very discerning cook, too, because my hubby is hard to please. So - yeah. If my husband raves about it, then it has to be good!
5 starsApril 14, 2009


from Northridge, CA, United States wrote:7  0

Every year my friends are amazed that the ham I am serving is really not a Honeybaked. Costco Spiral Ham $12.00,
Propane Torch $24.00. Taste Priceless.
5 starsNovember 25, 2008


from culver City, United States wrote:15  0

We tried this today. I bought a 5 lb Boar's Head Sweet Boneless Smoked Ham. I sliced it as thinly as possible. I didn't slice all the way through. Rubbed the recipe, used the burner. Did this a few times. Warmed it in the oven. It was BETTER than Honeybaked! The Boars Head boneless ham was super high quality. Thank you DAVE!
5 starsDecember 26, 2007


from barberton oh, United States wrote:10  0

No one could tell the difference! it was amazing and I really cant cook well but it was so easy for me to doand turned out perfect!!! Saved me so much money!!! I found my new family tradition.thanks!
5 starsDecember 13, 2007


from Colorado, United States wrote:13  0

I decided to try this as a dry run for Christmas, and didn't have the blow torch....I cooked the ham as usual, then sliced it while it was warm, and added enough water to the glaze mixture to make it a little runny, and then drizzled it over the whole ham and in between the slices. YUMMY! I WILL be doing the recipe as directed above for Christmas.
5 starsDecember 9, 2007


from Missouri, United States wrote:14  0

Just did this like 10 mins ago. It is AWESOME and the ham tastes perfect. It's also really pretty and saved me 60-70 bucks
5 starsApril 8, 2007


from the northwest, United States wrote:15  0

i, literally, just tried this recipe today for my families xmas dinner and i am glad to report that it turned out wonderful. being the first year to host the gathering my family now requests that i cook the hams for every occassion! it saved me atleast 60 bucks if i had gone the other route and actually bought a real honeybaked ham; plus my bf had a ton of fun with the torch! =)
5 starsDecember 26, 2006


from Laguna Niguel CA, United States wrote:20  3

I was going to do this last year, but thought I needed a big blowtorch. Thank you for setting me straight. Christmas, here I come.
5 starsDecember 7, 2005


from NOLA, United States wrote:39  1

I just did this for Easter Sunday, and it was the exact taste of a Honeybaked ham. I got the tiny butane blowtorch at Home Depot for $8.00.
5 starsMarch 29, 2005


 
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