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home > recipes > candy / snacks > korean fried honey cake
from US Yakgwa Pepero Day is a unofficial holiday in South Korea similar to Valentine's Day or Sweetest Day. It is named after the Korean snack Pepero and held on November 11, since the date "11/11" resemble four sticks of Pepero. The holiday is observed mostly by young people and couples, who exchange Pepero sticks, other candies, and romantic gifts. According to the story, Pepero Day was started in 1994 by students at a girls' middle school in Busan, where they exchanged Pepero sticks as gifts to wish one another to grow "as tall and slender as a Pepero" (Pepero means "thin like a stick"). However, it is more likely it was initiated by Lotte, the company which produces Pepero. While in most countries of the world, November 11th is a day of remembrance (since it signaled the end of World War I), in Korea it is a day of romance, gaudy cardboard packaging emblazoned with butchered English love lines, and massive fortunes earned by convenience stores and Wonka-esque entrepreneurs. Many students are truant on this day to celebrate with their friends. In Japan, a similar Pocky Day was held on November 11 in 1999, which was the 11th year of the Heisei era. The date, 11/11 of the 11th year, resembled 6 sticks of Pocky. According to Korean sources this day was based on the Pepero Day. Cookie 1 cup flour 3Tbsp sesame seed oil 3Tbsp rice wine 2Tbsp ginger juice 2Tbsp honey Salt and pepper to taste Syrup 1 cup sugar 1 cup water 2Tbsp honey 1tsp ginger juice 1/2tsp cinnamon powder 2Tbsp finely minced pine nuts 4 cups oil for frying 1. Sift flour, salt and pepper to get rid of the lumps. Add sesame seed oil and mix well. 2. In a bowl combine rice wine, ginger juice and honey, and evenly pour in the mixture to the flour. Knead the flour mixture to make the dough. 3. Flatten the dough to about 1 centimeter-thick sheet and use a cookie cutter to cut out the desired cookie shapes. You may make little slits or draw patterns with a stick on the cookie surface to make interesting decorations. Also poke little holes on the cookie. 4. Deep fry the cookie on low heat, about 140 degrees Celsius until the outside becomes golden brown and the inside is cooked thoroughly. 5. In another pan, make syrup by combining sugar and water and boiling it down on a medium heat until it comes to about one cup. 6. After cooling down the syrup, add honey, ginger juice and cinnamon powder to make the honey syrup. 7. Dip the just fried cookies into the honey syrup and let it seep into the cookies. Sprinkle the finely minced pine nuts before serving the cookie. Tips 1. Don’t knead the dough for too long, or else the cookies will fall apart. 2. The point of making good yakgwa is to make it soft and chewy, a bit harder than soft chocolate chip cookies, but softer and less crumbly than biscuits. The key to achieving that hardness is to keep the temperature of the frying oil consistent at 140 degrees Celsius. 3. If you have a traditional Korean cookie mold, you may use it to make flowery patterns on the yakgwa.

Korean Fried Honey Cake


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list all recipes for CANDY-SNACKS (223)
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keyword: korean
keyword: fried
keyword: honey
ethnicity: korean
recipes for candy-snacks
recipes by amanda
Email Address:
(posted November 11, 2006)

from US

Yakgwa

Pepero Day is a unofficial holiday in South Korea similar to Valentine's Day or Sweetest Day. It is named after the Korean snack Pepero and held on November 11, since the
date "11/11" resemble four sticks of Pepero. The holiday is observed mostly by young people and couples, who exchange Pepero sticks, other candies, and romantic gifts.

According to the story, Pepero Day was started in 1994 by students at a girls' middle school in Busan, where they exchanged Pepero sticks as gifts to wish one another to grow "as tall and slender as a Pepero" (Pepero means "
thin like a stick"). However, it is more likely it was initiated by Lotte, the company which produces Pepero.

While in most countries of the world, November 11th is a day of remembrance (since it signaled the end of World War I), in Korea it is a day of romance, gaudy cardboard packaging emblazoned with butchered English love lines, and
massive fortunes earned by convenience stores and Wonka-esque entrepreneurs. Many students are truant on this day to celebrate with their friends.

In Japan, a similar Pocky Day was held on November 11 in 1999, which was the 11th year of the Heisei era. The
date, 11/11 of the 11th year, resembled 6 sticks of Pocky. According to Korean sources this day was based on the Pepero Day.

Cookie
1 cup
flour
3Tbsp
sesame
seed oil
3Tbsp
rice wine
2Tbsp ginger juice
2Tbsp
honey
Salt and pepper to taste

Syrup
1 cup
sugar
1 cup water
2Tbsp
honey
1tsp ginger juice
1/2tsp
cinnamon powder

2Tbsp finely minced pine
nuts
4 cups oil for frying

1.
Sift flour, salt and pepper to get rid of the lumps. Add sesame
seed oil and mix well.
2. In a bowl
combine
rice
wine, ginger juice and honey, and evenly pour in the mixture to the flour. Knead the flour mixture to make the dough.
3. Flatten the
dough to about 1 centimeter-thick sheet and use a
cookie cutter to cut out the desired cookie shapes. You may make little slits or draw patterns with a stick on the cookie surface to make interesting decorations. Also poke little holes on the cookie.
4.
Deep fry the cookie on low heat, about 140 degrees Celsius until the outside becomes golden brown and the inside is cooked thoroughly.
5. In another
pan, make syrup by combining sugar and water and boiling it down on a medium heat until it comes to about one cup.
6. After cooling down the syrup, add
honey, ginger juice and cinnamon powder to make the honey syrup.
7. Dip the just fried cookies into the
honey syrup and let it seep into the cookies. Sprinkle the finely minced pine nuts before serving the cookie.

Tips
1. Don’t
knead the dough for too long, or else the cookies will fall apart.
2. The point of making good yakgwa is to make it
soft and chewy, a bit harder than soft chocolate chip cookies, but softer and less crumbly than biscuits. The key to achieving that hardness is to keep the temperature of the frying oil consistent at 140 degrees Celsius.
3. If you have a traditional Korean
cookie mold, you may use it to make flowery patterns on the yakgwa.



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