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home > recipes > meat > mistaken goulasch
Over forty years ago when I first started cooking, I seriously misread a cookbook recipe for what I now realize would not have been an authentic goulasch anyhow. But the dish as I made it was so tasty that I've continued making it over all these years; the name was given to it by one of my kids when she first heard the story. MISTAKEN GOULASCH FOR FOUR 1 tablespoon cooking oil 4 large onions, thinly-sliced 1 pound beef suitable for stewing (i.e., chuck, round, etc.), cut into bite-size pieces 1 small can (8 oz.) tomato paste 1 teaspoon salt, 1/4 teaspoon pepper 2 tablespoons (yes, that much!) sweet paprika 1 tablespoon caraway seed (optional, but they'll dissolve in the long cooking so don't omit them just to keep them out of your teeth-- they do give flavor) water Heat oil in a large heavy pot which has a cover. Add onions, and cook covered over medium-low heat for ten minutes, stirring occasionally. Onions should be translucent and limp after that time, but not brown. Remove onions (I simply invert the covered pot and let them be caught by the cover) and set aside. Raise heat and brown cubes of beef in batches, so as not to cool the pot by putting too many in. Return onions; add tomato paste and seasonings, and just enough water to barely cover the mixture. Stir well; raise heat to bring pot to boiling, then reduce heat to a simmer and cover. Cook for as long as you can manage, at least three hours, or place for the same time or longer in oven heated to 250 degrees. The onions should dissolve and disappear into the sauce. The longer this cooks over low heat the better it will taste, and as with all these long-cooked things, it's even better the day after it's first cooked. Serve ladled over cooked noodles or rice, and use any left-overs just as they are as a shepherd's pie topped with mashed potato mixed with egg and browned in the oven. Esther H. Vail, Rochester NY USA (esther@rochgte.fidonet.org)

Mistaken Goulasch


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keyword: mistaken
keyword: goulasch
recipes for meat
recipes by esther
Email Address:
(posted August 8, 1995)

Over forty years ago when I first started cooking, I seriously
misread a cookbook recipe for what I now realize would not have been
an authentic goulasch anyhow. But the dish as I made it was so
tasty that I've continued making it over all these years; the name
was given to it by one of my kids when she first heard the story.

MISTAKEN GOULASCH FOR FOUR

1 tablespoon cooking oil
4 large onions, thinly-sliced
1 pound
beef suitable for stewing (i.e., chuck, round, etc.), cut
into bite-size pieces
1 small can (8 oz.)
tomato paste
1 teaspoon
salt, 1/4 teaspoon pepper
2 tablespoons (yes, that much!)
sweet paprika
1 tablespoon
caraway
seed (optional, but they'll dissolve in the long
cooking so don't omit them just to keep them out of your teeth--
they do give flavor)
water
Heat oil in a large
heavy
pot which has a cover. Add onions,
and cook covered over medium-low heat for ten minutes, stirring
occasionally. Onions should be translucent and limp after that
time, but not
brown. Remove onions (I simply invert the covered
pot
and let them be caught by the cover) and set aside. Raise heat and
brown cubes of beef in batches, so as not to cool the
pot by putting
too many in. Return onions; add
tomato paste and seasonings, and
just enough water to barely cover the mixture. Stir well; raise
heat to bring
pot to boiling, then reduce heat to a simmer and
cover. Cook for as
long as you can manage, at least three hours, or
place for the same time or longer in oven heated to 250 degrees.
The onions should
dissolve and disappear into the sauce. The longer
this cooks over low heat the better it will taste, and as with all
these
long-cooked things, it's even better the day after it's first
cooked. Serve ladled over cooked noodles or rice, and use any
left-overs just as they are as a
shepherd's
pie topped with mashed
potato mixed with egg and browned in the oven.

Esther H. Vail, Rochester NY USA
(esther@rochgte.fidonet.org)




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