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home > recipes > meat > mongolian lamb fire pot
This recipe comes from Classic Chinese Cookbook by Yan-Kit So. It is my favorite Chinese cookbook because she is from Hong Kong and excels at Cantonese cooking. I can't vouch for the authenticity of her Bejing cooking but the recipe looks good. Mongolian Lamb Fire Pot This Mongolian dish, which has long since become part and parcel of Peking food, ranks second in fame only to Peking duck. Ingredients ½ leg of lamb, ideally, spring lamb, about 2 ½ pounds 4 ounces cellophane noodles (mung bean) 1 Chinese celery cabbage, about 1 ¾ pounds, trimmed 8 ounces dried egg or buckwheat noodles (soba) For the dip 8 tablespoons sesame paste, well stirred in the jar 2 cakes fermented red bean curd or about 4 tablespoons and 2 tablespoons own juice (good stuff TB) 6 tablespoons Shaosing wine or medium dry sherry 3 tablespoons sugar 8 tablespoons thin soy sauce 3 to 4 tablespoons hot chilli oil (homemade: 25 tiensin peppers, green tops off, 1 c of peanut oil heated till boiling, 1 heatproof jar. Put the chillies into the jar, pour the hot oil over it. It’s ready when the chillies float to the bottom, 1 or 2 days. Better than storebought. TB) 3 to 4 tablespoons sesame oil 4 tablespoons fish sauce 1. Ask the butcher to bone the lamb for you. If possible, freeze for 3 or 4 hours, so that the meat becomes firm and easier to cut into paper-thin slices. 2. Meanwhile, soak the cellophane noodles in plenty of boiling water in a bowl, for a minimum of 20 to 30 minutes, so they expand. (This seems too long to me, I think the kind I buy take only 5 minutes TB) Make 2 or 3 cuts with scissors to shorten them. Transfer to a serving bowl. 3. Slice the celery cabbage at 1 inch intervals. Put on a plate. 4. Plunge the noodles into plenty of boiling water (the egg or soba TB), return to a boil, then continue to cook for several minutes, until they are soft yet al dente. Drain and rinse under cold running water. Put on a plate or into a bowl. 5. Prepare the dip: Put the sesame paste into a fairly large serving bowl and gradually add about 4 ounces of water to dilute, stirring until smoothly blended. Add 3 or 4 tablespoons of water to the red bean curd and blend to a creamy consistency. Pour into the serving bowl, then add the wine or sherry, sugar, soy sauce, the oils and fish sauce and stir until well mixed. 6. Take the lamb out of the freezer. Trim excess fat and cut into slices, as paper-thin as you can possibly manage. Ideally, each slice should be about 4 by 1 ½ inches. Arrange them on several serving plates in single layers but overlapping each other. Refrigerate, covered, until ready to eat. 7. Put all ingredients on the dining table. 8. If a traditional fire pot is used, heat the charcoal and put into the chimney in the middle of the pot. Put on the table on top of a thick heatproof mat. An electric pot may be used. In either case, pour sufficient water into the heated pot to come about halfway up the sides, and bring back to a boil. The feast is now ready. 9. To serve, provide each person with a pair of bamboo chopsticks (not plastic or lacquered ones), a small wire strainer made especially for fire-pot feast (optional), a bowl and a small plate. 10. To eat, each person spoons some sauce into his bowl and adds some coriander leaves and scallions. Every one then picks up 1 or 2 slices of lamb at a time, puts them into the strainer (or uses chopsticks) and immerses them in the water in the pot. The meat is removed after a few seconds (or longer if very well-done meat is preferred) and dipped into the sauce before eating. 11. After about half of the lamb has been consumed and the water in the pot has become a tasty broth, put in some of the cabbage and cellophane noodles for everyone to share. They are dipped into the sauce before eating. Whenever necessary, replenish the water level in the pot. 12. After about three quarters of the lamb has been consumed, put in half or all of the remaining noodles. 13. At the end of the feast, the broth in the pot is shared. Each person spoons some into his bowl, mixes it with the remaining sauce and drinks it.

Mongolian Lamb Fire Pot


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(posted May 11, 2005)

This recipe comes from
Classic Chinese Cookbook by Yan-Kit So. It is my favorite Chinese cookbook because she is from Hong Kong and excels at Cantonese cooking. I can't vouch for the authenticity of her Bejing cooking but the recipe looks good.
Mongolian
Lamb Fire Pot
This Mongolian dish, which has
long since become part and parcel of Peking
food, ranks second in fame only to
Peking duck.

Ingredients
½ leg of
lamb, ideally, spring lamb, about 2 ½ pounds
4 ounces
cellophane
noodles (mung bean)
1 Chinese
celery cabbage, about 1 ¾ pounds, trimmed
8 ounces dried
egg or buckwheat noodles (soba)

For the dip
8 tablespoons sesame paste, well stirred in the jar
2 cakes fermented red
bean
curd or about 4 tablespoons and 2 tablespoons own juice (good stuff TB)
6 tablespoons Shaosing
wine or medium
dry sherry
3 tablespoons
sugar
8 tablespoons
thin soy sauce
3 to 4 tablespoons
hot chilli oil (homemade: 25 tiensin peppers, green tops off, 1 c of
peanut oil heated till boiling, 1 heatproof jar. Put the chillies into the jar, pour the hot oil over it. It’s ready when the chillies float to the bottom, 1 or 2 days. Better than storebought. TB)
3 to 4 tablespoons
sesame oil
4 tablespoons
fish sauce

1. Ask the butcher to
bone the lamb for you. If possible, freeze for 3 or 4 hours, so that the meat becomes firm and easier to cut into paper-
thin slices.

2. Meanwhile, soak the
cellophane
noodles in plenty of boiling water in a bowl, for a minimum of 20 to 30 minutes, so they expand. (This seems too long to me, I think the kind I buy take only 5 minutes TB) Make 2 or 3 cuts with scissors to shorten them. Transfer to a serving bowl.

3. Slice the
celery cabbage at 1 inch intervals. Put on a plate.

4. Plunge the
noodles into plenty of boiling water (the egg or soba TB), return to a boil, then continue to cook for several minutes, until they are soft yet
al dente. Drain and rinse under cold running water. Put on a plate or into a bowl.

5. Prepare the dip: Put the sesame paste into a fairly large serving bowl and gradually add about 4 ounces of water to
dilute, stirring until smoothly blended. Add 3 or 4 tablespoons of water to the red bean
curd and blend to a creamy consistency. Pour into the serving bowl, then add the wine or sherry, sugar, soy sauce, the oils and fish sauce and stir until well mixed.

6. Take the
lamb out of the freezer. Trim excess fat and cut into slices, as paper-
thin as you can possibly manage. Ideally, each slice should be about 4 by 1 ½ inches. Arrange them on several serving plates in single layers but overlapping each other. Refrigerate, covered, until ready to eat.

7. Put all ingredients on the dining table.

8. If a traditional fire
pot is used, heat the charcoal and put into the chimney in the middle of the pot. Put on the table on top of a thick heatproof mat. An electric pot may be used. In either case, pour sufficient water into the heated pot to come about halfway up the sides, and bring back to a boil. The feast is now ready.

9. To serve, provide each person with a pair of bamboo
chopsticks (not plastic or lacquered ones), a small wire strainer made especially for fire-
pot feast (optional), a bowl and a small plate.

10. To eat, each person spoons some
sauce into his bowl and adds some coriander leaves and scallions. Every one then picks up 1 or 2 slices of lamb at a time, puts them into the strainer (or uses chopsticks) and immerses them in the water in the
pot. The meat is removed after a few seconds (or longer if very well-done meat is preferred) and dipped into the sauce before eating.

11. After about half of the
lamb has been consumed and the water in the
pot has become a tasty broth, put in some of the cabbage and cellophane noodles for everyone to share. They are dipped into the sauce before eating. Whenever necessary, replenish the water level in the pot.

12. After about three quarters of the
lamb has been consumed, put in half or all of the remaining noodles.

13. At the end of the feast, the
broth in the
pot is shared. Each person spoons some into his bowl, mixes it with the remaining sauce and drinks it.


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