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home > recipes > salads and dressings > salade olivier
The Israeli food and wine critic Daniel Rogov disagrees with the widespread view that salade Olivier was created by a chef named Olivier at the Hermitage Restaurant in Moscow. Here's what Rogov has to say, together with Rogov's recipe: "Based on peas, carrot cubes, potato cubes and mayonnaise and served in virtually every restaurant in Germany and nearly every French bistro and brasserie, "Russian salad" is probably one of the world's best known side dishes. What is not so widely known is that the dish served has nothing whatever to do with Russia. "The simple truth is that the original version of Russian salad was devised by Jacques Olivier, a French chef who had been born in Dijon. It is true that Olivier had been in the service of Czar Nicholas II. Unlike his employer, however, the chef escaped from Russia and opened a restaurant in Wiesbaden, Germany and it was there that he invented the dish that he named 'salade a la Russe' in honor of his former employer. "Olivier's dish, as can be seen in the recipe that follows, is a simple but absolute delight. Unfortunately, since its creation many restaurants have sought 'short-cuts', nearly all of which made the dish decidedly inferior. In fact, during a visit to Paris, Olivier himself sampled the version of his dish being offered at Maison Doree, a prestigious restaurant of the day. The chef was so offended that he stormed out of the restaurant in a rage, took the first train back to Wiesbaden and never again returned to Paris." Salade a la Russe sometimes known as Salade Olivier 1/2 kilo roasted chicken meat, cut in small cubes 4 medium boiled potatoes, cooled, peeled and sliced 4 hard boiled eggs, cut in eighths 2 half-sour pickles, sliced thinly 3/4 cup mayonnaise 1/2 cup sour cream salt and pepper 6 - 8 hearts of lettuce 2 tomatoes, cut in wedges 16 green olives 2 Tbsp. capers In a mixing bowl combine the chicken, potatoes, eggs and pickles. Fold in the mayonnaise and sour cream, season to taste and mix gently but well. Serve the salad on a bed of the lettuce hearts and garnished with the tomatoes, olives and capers. (Serves 6 - 8) P.S. The chef at New York's Russian Tea Room included Salade Oliver, made with truffles, in a dinner that he did at the James Beard Foundation last November.

Salade Olivier


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(posted October 7, 2004)

The Israeli food and
wine critic Daniel Rogov disagrees with the widespread view that salade Olivier was created by a chef named Olivier at the Hermitage Restaurant in Moscow. Here's what Rogov has to say, together with Rogov's recipe:

"Based on peas,
carrot cubes, potato cubes and mayonnaise and served in virtually every restaurant in Germany and nearly every French bistro and brasserie, "Russian salad" is probably one of the world's best known side dishes. What is not so widely known is that the dish served has nothing whatever to do with Russia.

"The
simple truth is that the original version of Russian salad was devised by Jacques Olivier, a French chef who had been born in Dijon. It is true that Olivier had been in the service of Czar Nicholas II. Unlike his employer, however, the chef escaped from Russia and opened a restaurant in Wiesbaden, Germany and it was there that he invented the dish that he named 'salade a la Russe' in honor of his former employer.

"Olivier's dish, as can be seen in the recipe that follows, is a
simple but absolute delight. Unfortunately, since its creation many restaurants have sought '
short-cuts', nearly all of which made the dish decidedly inferior. In fact, during a visit to Paris, Olivier himself sampled the version of his dish being offered at Maison Doree, a prestigious restaurant of the day. The chef was so offended that he stormed out of the restaurant in a rage, took the first train back to Wiesbaden and never again returned to Paris."

Salade a la Russe
sometimes known as Salade Olivier

1/2 kilo roasted
chicken meat, cut in small cubes
4 medium boiled potatoes, cooled, peeled and sliced
4
hard boiled
eggs, cut in eighths
2 half-
sour pickles, sliced thinly
3/4 cup
mayonnaise
1/2 cup
sour cream
salt and pepper
6 - 8 hearts of
lettuce
2 tomatoes,
cut in wedges
16
green olives
2 Tbsp. capers

In a mixing bowl
combine the chicken, potatoes,
eggs and pickles. Fold in the mayonnaise and
sour cream, season to taste and mix gently but well. Serve the salad on a bed of the lettuce hearts and garnished with the tomatoes, olives and capers.

(Serves 6 - 8)

P.S. The chef at
New York's Russian Tea Room included Salade Oliver, made with truffles, in a dinner that he did at the James Beard Foundation last November.


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