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home > recipes > breads > sally lunn bread 2
from PA, US Sally Lunn is one of those recipes that is so old it can be called a "receipt," the name given to instructions in cookery up until several generations ago. The way to prepare and serve it, however, is as varied as the stories about why it is called "Sally Lunn." There are recipes that call for yeast and those that call for baking powder. There are recipes that call for half a pound of butter, or butter the size of an egg, or shortening in place of butter. There are recipes that require a lot of beating or no beating, . There are recipes using cornmeal and there are recipes that call for adding lemon peel and spices to the flour. Some say to put the dough in a square pan, others call for a round pan, loaf pans, muffin tins, a Turk's head iron mold, even a bundt or tube pan. As to the name, there are those who say that Sally was the daughter of a pastry cook in Bath, England. Because the bun is similar to a French brioche, others say she must have been a French Huguenot woman who baked them. Then they say that no French lady would be named Lunn or called Sally. Others say there was no one named Sally at all; the words are a corruption of "sol et lune," the French words for sun and moon that may have been used to describe the round shape of the buns, or perhaps a French word like "solimeme" for a type of brioche. This recipe is a quick version of Sally Lunn bread. 4 cups flour 1/2 cup fresh butter, softened 2 eggs 2 cups milk 2 teaspoons cream of tartar 1 teaspoon baking soda 2 tablespoons sugar 1 teaspoon salt Mix ingredients together lightly, form into a loaf and bake at 350F for 45 minutes to an hour, or until a tester comes out clean.

Sally Lunn Bread 2


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keyword: sally
keyword: bread
ethnicity: french
recipes for breads
recipes by dave
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(posted December 12, 2006)

from PA, US

Sally Lunn is one of those recipes that is so old it can be called a "receipt," the name given to instructions in cookery up until several generations ago. The way to prepare and serve it, however, is as varied as the stories about why it is called "Sally Lunn."

There are recipes that call for
yeast and those that call for baking powder. There are recipes that call for half a pound of butter, or butter the size of an egg, or shortening in place of butter. There are recipes that require a lot of beating or no beating, . There are recipes using cornmeal and there are recipes that call for adding lemon peel and spices to the flour. Some say to put the dough in a square pan, others call for a round pan, loaf pans, muffin tins, a Turk's head iron mold, even a bundt or tube pan.

As to the name, there are those who say that Sally was the daughter of a
pastry cook in Bath, England. Because the bun is similar to a French brioche, others say she
must have been a French Huguenot woman who baked them. Then they say that no French lady would be named Lunn or called Sally. Others say there was no one named Sally at all; the words are a corruption of "sol et lune," the French words for sun and moon that may have been used to describe the round shape of the buns, or perhaps a French word like "solimeme" for a type of brioche.

This recipe is a quick version of
Sally Lunn bread.

4 cups
flour
1/2 cup fresh
butter, softened
2
eggs
2 cups
milk
2 teaspoons
cream of tartar
1 teaspoon
baking soda
2 tablespoons
sugar
1 teaspoon
salt

Mix ingredients together lightly, form into a loaf and
bake at 350F for 45 minutes to an hour, or until a tester comes out clean.



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