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home > recipes > seafood > seppie in inzimino
This is a traditionally Tuscan way of cooking cuttlefish of all sizes; you can also use octopus. The red pepper, which is optional, is typical of Livorno. To serve four as a main course, or 6-8 as a second course you will need: 1 1/2 - 2 pounds fresh or frozen cuttlefish (the latter should be thawed) 2 pounds fresh spinach or 2 packed cups thawed frozen spinach 1 small onion, minced 2 tablespoons minced parsley A few leaves of minced basil, if you like it and it's in season 1/4 cup olive oil 1-2 dried red peppers, seeded (optional) 1 cup canned tomato pulp or canned plum tomatoes Salt and pepper to taste Clan the cuttlefish, wash them well, and chop them into bite-sized pieces. Wash and coarsely chop the spinach, if you're using fresh spinach. Mince the onion, set it aside, and mince the parsley and basil. Set the oil to heat in a pot big enough to hold the spinach, and add the onion. When it's turned translucent, add the parsley and basil and continue to sauté the mixture for a minute longer. Add the spinach; if it's fresh, turn the heat to high till it cooks down, stirring every minute or so. If using frozen spinach, heat it through. In either case, add the fish once it will fit in the pot, stir in the tomatoes and the red pepper, salt, and pepper to taste, going easy on them because the sauce will be reduced considerably. Simmer, keeping the pot partially covered and stirring every now and then, till the fish is cooked and the sauce is thick. (Should you use frozen spinach, you may need to add hot water to keep everything from drying out). This will take about 40 minutes. Check seasoning, cook five minutes more, and serve, with a side dish of salad, and bread. This is substantial. If you forego the red pepper, it will go well with a rosato ro a light red. If, on the other hand, you use red pepper, a Fiano from Campania might be nice. Another thing you might like is Philippe Poniatowski's baked royal dorade, which is at the end of my review of his wines, on http://italianfood.miningco.com/library/weekly/aa072997.htm. The technique will work with any large (2 pound), flavorful fish.

Seppie in Inzimino


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keyword: seppie
keyword: inzimino
ethnicity: italian
recipes for seafood
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(posted March 2, 2006)

This is a traditionally Tuscan way of cooking
cuttlefish of all sizes; you can also use octopus. The red pepper, which is optional, is typical of Livorno. To serve four as a main course, or 6-8 as a second course you will need:

1 1/2 - 2 pounds fresh or frozen
cuttlefish (the latter should be thawed)
2 pounds fresh
spinach or 2 packed cups thawed frozen spinach
1 small
onion, minced
2 tablespoons minced
parsley
A few leaves of minced
basil, if you like it and it's in season
1/4 cup
olive oil
1-2 dried red peppers, seeded (optional)
1 cup canned
tomato pulp or canned plum tomatoes
Salt and pepper to taste

Clan the
cuttlefish, wash them well, and chop them into bite-sized pieces. Wash and coarsely chop the spinach, if you're using fresh spinach. Mince the onion, set it aside, and mince the parsley and basil.

Set the oil to heat in a
pot big enough to hold the spinach, and add the onion. When it's turned translucent, add the parsley and basil and continue to sauté the mixture for a minute longer. Add the spinach; if it's fresh, turn the heat to high till it cooks down, stirring every minute or so. If using frozen spinach, heat it through. In either case, add the fish once it will fit in the pot, stir in the tomatoes and the red pepper, salt, and pepper to taste, going easy on them because the sauce will be reduced considerably. Simmer, keeping the pot partially covered and stirring every now and then, till the fish is cooked and the sauce is thick. (Should you use frozen spinach, you may need to add hot water to keep everything from drying out). This will take about 40 minutes. Check seasoning, cook five minutes more, and serve, with a side dish of salad, and bread.

This is substantial. If you forego the red pepper, it will go well with a rosato ro a
light red. If, on the other hand, you use red pepper, a Fiano from Campania might be nice.

Another thing you might like is Philippe Poniatowski's
baked royal dorade, which is at the end of my review of his wines, on http://italianfood.miningco.com/library/weekly/aa072997.htm. The technique will work with any large (2 pound), flavorful fish.


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