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home > recipes > vegetables > sicilian roasted artichoke
from Chicago, IL From Ronald Scro We also make a roasted artichoke with olive oil, salt, and garlic that I have never encountered anywhere else. My mother, Teresa Scro, from whom I learned to cook, never used recipes. I had the unusual fortune of often helping her in the kitchen as a child but I remember only the preparing of the artichoke and then the later cooking stage. The artichokes would be in the oven sitting in a low metal pan with an inch of water covered by aluminum foil. I remember the aluminum foil covering the artichokes being removed for the final roasting which turned the ends of the leaves black, encrusted with salt. Obviously, this was an innovation on her part since I doubt that my grandmother used aluminum foil. In that spirit, I have devised a method of making them that seems faster and, for reasons of failed memory or technique, only almost as good. I suppose I could contact my aunt for a more authentic approach, and if you request so, I will. I prepare the artichoke in the typical manner, cutting off the stem and the end of each leaf. Then I wash the choke and cook it in a covered pan on the stove (or microwave) with an inch of water. Before cooking I drizzle olive oil over each and add more salt than can possibly be healthy. (I use olive oil with garlic but I don't think my mother used garlic when she made it.) When they are nearly done I put the pan uncovered in the oven and roast them. They never come out as salty or as perfectly darkly-colored yet flexible as when my mother made them but nevertheless they impress everyone who has sat at our table on a roasted artichoke day. My mother learned this recipe from her mother-in-law Francesca Scro, who emigrated from Marineo, Sicily at the turn of the century and had no exposure to Northern Italians in Italy or the US, so I consider it a Sicilian recipe.

Sicilian Roasted Artichoke


average rating = 4 stars(4.00001 comment available)
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keyword: sicilian
keyword: roasted
keyword: artichoke
ethnicity: italian
recipes for vegetables
recipes by dave
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(posted November 12, 2003)

from Chicago, IL

From Ronald Scro
We also make a roasted
artichoke with olive oil, salt, and garlic that I have never encountered anywhere else.

My mother, Teresa Scro, from whom I learned to cook, never used recipes. I had the unusual fortune of often helping her in the kitchen as a child but I remember only the preparing of the
artichoke and then the later cooking stage. The artichokes would be in the oven sitting in a low metal pan with an inch of water covered by aluminum foil. I remember the aluminum foil covering the artichokes being removed for the final roasting which turned the ends of the leaves black, encrusted with salt.

Obviously, this was an innovation on her part since I doubt that my grandmother used
aluminum foil. In that spirit, I have devised a method of making them that seems faster and, for reasons of failed memory or technique, only almost as good. I suppose I could contact my aunt for a more authentic approach, and if you request so, I will.

I prepare the
artichoke in the typical manner, cutting off the stem and the end of each leaf. Then I wash the choke and cook it in a covered pan on the stove (or microwave) with an inch of water. Before cooking I drizzle
olive oil over each and add more salt than can possibly be healthy. (I use olive oil with garlic but I don't think my mother used garlic when she made it.) When they are nearly done I put the pan uncovered in the oven and roast them. They never come out as salty or as perfectly darkly-colored yet flexible as when my mother made them but nevertheless they impress everyone who has sat at our table on a roasted artichoke day.

My mother learned this recipe from her mother-in-law Francesca Scro, who emigrated from Marineo,
Sicily at the turn of the century and had no exposure to Northern Italians in Italy or the US, so I consider it a Sicilian recipe.



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from delaware water gap, PA, United States wrote:0  0

re: Ronald Scro. I have been looking for recipies that Teresa Scro made, I'm her great-granddaughter, and your neice. I have been trying to learn to cook some of those recipies, and I remember those artichokes. If you are still able to contact your aunt regarding recipies, or have any that you remember, I would love to learn to cook them, like Teresa did.
4 starsMarch 12, 2013


 
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