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home > recipes > cookies > springerle
from Wisconsin, US You will need a springerle mold or rolling pin for these cookies. You can pick one up from most kitchen specialty shops. Springerle are great when dunked in coffee. This recipe make about 24 cookies. Ingredients 4 cups flour 3 cups white sugar 5 eggs 1 tsp. baking powder 1 tsp. salt 2 Tbs. Anise seed Directions: Whip the eggs until they are light and fluffy, either with an electric mixer or by hand, in a large mixing bowl. Use your favorite mixing bowl, one that's large enough to really mix ingredients in, so you can "get into it" without feeling that food will fly out the sides. Mix in all the dry ingredients, (except the Anise seed) one cup at a time, until the dough is sticky and shiny-looking. The dough looks very pretty, almost like wood that has been well sanded and varnished. Put the dough, still in the mixing bowl, in the refrigerator and chill thoroughly for at least 2 hours. Sprinkle a little flour on the bread-board, take a piece of dough about the size of a tennis ball, and shape it into a rectangle about 2" by 3" and 1" thick. Either roll out with a design-carved Springerle rolling pin, or press into shape with a similarly carved wooden mold. Spray the rolling pin or mold with a non-stick spray. (I prefer the mold. My grandma preferred the rolling pin.) Rolling or pressing the dough, squash it down to about inch thick. When you lift up the mold or rolling pin, the dough will have nice-looking imprints. Cut the cookies apart and place them on a cookie sheet that has been buttered or sprayed with non-stick spray and sprinkled with some Anise seeds. Set the cookies an inch apart. The leftover scraps of dough can be reworked nicely a couple of times, as long as you don't get too much flour in the dough. Now find a cool place to let the cookies sit and dry. Cover them with a dish towel, and let them sit for 24 hours but not too much longer. What you are aiming for is to dry them enough to keep the imprint distinct, but not so dry that the surface cracks. The towel helps to keep this from happening. Pre-heat the oven to 300 and bake for about 30 minutes, or until the surface of the cookie shows just a hint of brown. Cool, and store in an airtight container. *Suggestion: Before baking the entire batch, try baking one cookie just to see whether the imprint stays visible after baking. If not, let the unbaked Springerle dry a little longer before baking.

Springerle


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(posted May 8, 2010)

from Wisconsin, US

You will need a
springerle mold or rolling pin for these cookies. You can pick one up from most kitchen specialty shops. Springerle are great when dunked in coffee. This recipe make about 24 cookies. Ingredients

4 cups
flour
3 cups white
sugar
5
eggs
1 tsp.
baking powder
1 tsp.
salt
2 Tbs.
Anise seed

Directions:

Whip the
eggs until they are light and fluffy, either with an electric mixer or by hand, in a large mixing bowl. Use your favorite mixing bowl, one that's large enough to really mix ingredients in, so you can "get into it" without feeling that food will fly out the sides.

Mix in all the
dry ingredients, (except the Anise seed) one cup at a time, until the dough is sticky and shiny-looking. The dough looks very pretty, almost like wood that has been well sanded and varnished.

Put the
dough, still in the mixing bowl, in the refrigerator and chill thoroughly for at least 2 hours.

Sprinkle a little
flour on the bread-board, take a piece of dough about the size of a tennis ball, and shape it into a rectangle about 2" by 3" and 1" thick.

Either
roll out with a design-carved Springerle rolling pin, or press into shape with a similarly carved wooden mold. Spray the rolling pin or mold with a non-stick spray. (I prefer the mold. My grandma preferred the rolling pin.)

Rolling or pressing the
dough, squash it down to about inch thick. When you lift up the mold or rolling pin, the dough will have nice-looking imprints.

Cut the cookies apart and place them on a
cookie sheet that has been buttered or sprayed with non-stick spray and sprinkled with some Anise seeds. Set the cookies an inch apart.

The leftover scraps of
dough can be reworked nicely a couple of times, as long as you don't get too much flour in the dough.

Now find a cool place to let the cookies sit and
dry. Cover them with a dish towel, and let them sit for 24 hours but not too much longer. What you are aiming for is to dry them enough to keep the imprint distinct, but not so dry that the surface cracks. The towel helps to keep this from happening.

Pre-heat the oven to 300 and
bake for about 30 minutes, or until the surface of the cookie shows just a hint of brown.

Cool, and store in an airtight container.

*Suggestion: Before
baking the entire batch, try baking one cookie just to see whether the imprint stays visible after baking. If not, let the unbaked Springerle
dry a little longer before baking.



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