International Recipes Dot Net: Real Recipes from Real People


  You are not logged in
Follow on Twitter!
Search Recipes:
 
site map
advertising info
privacy policy

Share Your Recipe
Most Popular Recipes
Highest Rated Recipes
SyndicateThis


Random Recipe
Gateau de Saumon






Food Dictionary
Theme Sections
Photo Gallery
F.A.Q.


home > recipes > beans / grains > wild rice with cherries and hazlenuts
Wild rice has been a staple for the Ojibwa, Chippewa, and Algonquin people for thousands of years. Native Americans in the Great Lakes region still use wild rice in just about everything: cakes, breads, omelets, muffins, casseroles, pancakes, and so on. The dark, robust grain (technically an aquatic grass) is complex, nutty, and pleasantly bitter -- and richer in protein, minerals, and B vitamins than wheat, barley, oats, or rye. When shopping for wild rice, you might notice a light brown "wild rice mix" as well as the more familiar dark variety. This paddy-grown grain is not the same thing as authentic Native American wild rice. It is lighter in color and milder in flavor-and cooks in less time and with less water If you make this recipe with "wild rice mix," cook it as you would any long-grain brown rice. Dried cranberries can be substituted for the cherries. Hazelnuts are also known as filberts. YIELD: 3 or 4 servings PREPARATION TIME: 1 1/4 hours (2 minutes of work) 1 cup wild rice 2 1/2 cups water 1/4 teaspoon salt Brown sugar or pure maple syrup 1/2 cup dried cherries 1/2 cup chopped hazelnuts, lightly toasted Milk, soy milk, or cream Place the wild rice, water, and salt in a medium-sized saucepan and bring to a boil over medium heat. When it reaches a boil, cover the pot, and lower the heat to a bare simmer. Cook for 1 1/4 hours, or until all the water is absorbed and the rice is tender and has "butterflied," or burst open. (If the grain has become tender but there is still water left, drain it off.) Remove from the heat, and stir in the sugar or maple syrup and the cherries. Serve hot, topped with chopped hazelnuts and the milk of your choice.

Wild Rice with Cherries and Hazlenuts


SUBMITTED BY
list all recipes for BEANS-GRAINS (120)
list all recipes by SMART_BOOK2 (3)


   

conversions contact author view cookbook print recipe
email recipe add to cookbook add to calendar add to shopping list

Recipe Alert This is Found in... Most Emailed Recipes
(posted February 14, 2005)

Wild rice has been a staple for the Ojibwa, Chippewa, and Algonquin people for thousands of years. Native Americans in the Great Lakes region still use wild rice in just about everything: cakes, breads, omelets, muffins, casseroles, pancakes, and so on. The dark, robust grain (technically an aquatic grass) is complex, nutty, and pleasantly bitter -- and richer in protein, minerals, and B vitamins than wheat, barley, oats, or rye.

When shopping for
wild
rice, you might notice a light brown "wild rice mix" as well as the more familiar dark variety. This paddy-grown grain is not the same thing as authentic Native American wild rice. It is lighter in color and milder in flavor-and cooks in less time and with less water If you make this recipe with "wild rice mix," cook it as you would any long-grain brown rice.

Dried cranberries can be substituted for the cherries.

Hazelnuts are also known as filberts.

YIELD: 3 or 4 servings

PREPARATION TIME: 1 1/4 hours (2 minutes of work)

1 cup
wild
rice
2 1/2 cups water
1/4 teaspoon
salt
Brown sugar or pure maple syrup
1/2 cup dried cherries
1/2 cup chopped hazelnuts, lightly toasted
Milk, soy
milk, or cream

Place the
wild
rice, water, and salt in a medium-sized saucepan and bring to a boil over medium heat. When it reaches a boil, cover the pot, and lower the heat to a bare simmer. Cook for 1 1/4 hours, or until all the water is absorbed and the rice is tender and has "butterflied," or burst open. (If the grain has become tender but there is still water left, drain it off.)

Remove from the heat, and stir in the
sugar or maple syrup and the cherries.

Serve
hot, topped with chopped hazelnuts and the milk of your choice.


Please click here to read our policy on submitted comments
Be the first to leave a public comment about this recipe!

 
Rating:
Name:
Email 1:
City, State:
Country:
Comments:
1 Your email address will not be displayed to others, nor will it be used for any marketing purposes or released
to any third party.


©1995-2019 SimpleSolutions Corporation. All Rights Reserved.