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Food and Wine Dictionary


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 dill 

Thought by 1st-century Romans to be a good luck symbol, dill has been around for thousands of years. This annual herb grows up to a height of about 3 feet and hasfeathery green leaves called dill weed, marketed in both fresh and driedforms. The distinctive flavor of fresh dill weed in no way translates to itsdried form. Fresh dill does, however, quickly lose its fragrance during heating,so should be added toward the end of the cooking time. Dill weed is used toflavor many dishes such as salads, vegetables, meats and sauces. The tan, flatdill seed is actually the dried fruit of the herb. Heating brings out theflavor of dill seed, which is stronger and more pungent than that of the leaves.It's most often used in the United States for the brine in which dill pickles arecured. See also  HERBS; HERB AND SPICE CHART; A FIELD GUIDE TO HERBS

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Material adapted from the The New Food Lover's Companion

© Copyright Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 1995 based on
THE FOOD LOVER'S COMPANION, 2nd edition, by Sharon Tyler Herbst.


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