International Recipes Dot Net: Real Recipes from Real People


  You are not logged in
Follow on Twitter!
Search Recipes:
 
site map
advertising info
privacy policy

Share Your Recipe
Most Popular Recipes
Highest Rated Recipes
SyndicateThis


Random Recipe
Cherries n Cream Squares






Food Dictionary
Theme Sections
Photo Gallery
F.A.Q.


home > food & wine dictionary > pumpkin

Food and Wine Dictionary


Brown text or background indicates a food entry.
Blue text or background indicates a wine entry.

 pumpkin 

When the Colonists landed in North America they found the Indians growing and using pumpkins. This large, ungainly fruit was enthusiastically embraced by the new Americans and subsequently pumpkin pie became a national Thanksgiving tradition. It was so loved that one early Connecticut colony delayed Thanksgiving because the molasses needed to make this popular pie wasn't readily available. Large, round and orange, the pumpkin is a member of the gourd family, which also includes MUSKMELON, WATERMELON and SQUASH. Its orange flesh has a mild, sweet flavor and the seeds — husked and roasted — are delicately nutty. Pumpkin seeds are commonly known as PEPITAS. Fresh pumpkins are available in the fall and winter and some specimens have weighed in at well over 100 pounds. In general, however, the flesh from smaller sizes will be more tender and succulent. Choose pumpkins that are free from blemishes and heavy for their size. Store whole pumpkins at room temperature up to a month or refrigerate up to 3 months. Pureed pumpkin is also available canned. Pumpkin may be prepared in almost any way suitable for winter squash. It's a good source of vitamin A.

[
A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z ]

Material adapted from the The New Food Lover's Companion

© Copyright Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 1995 based on
THE FOOD LOVER'S COMPANION, 2nd edition, by Sharon Tyler Herbst.


©1995-2020 SimpleSolutions Corporation. All Rights Reserved.